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Archive for the ‘Janis Joplin’ Category.

This Week In Music History – September 8 – September 14

beatles1964montreal2On September 8, 1964, the Beatles performed at the Montreal Forum, the 16th city of their famous 1964 North American Tour. The Beatles gave a matinee performance to 9,500 fans in the afternoon followed by a sold-out evening concert before a crowd of 11,500. Opening acts included the Righteous Brothers, Jackie de Shannon, the Bill Black Combo, and the Exciters.

 

 

 

220px-BrothersandsistersallmanbrotherOn September 8, 1973, the Allman Brothers started a five week run at #1 on the US album chart with ‘Brothers And Sisters.’ The artwork was taken at “the Farm” in Juliette, Georgia and the front features drummer Butch Trucks’ son Vaylor and the back cover featured Berry Oakley’s daughter Brittany. The gate fold spread reveals a photo of the band and their extended families.

 

 

 

 

 

 

adollshouse_300x300On September 9, 1968, while working at Abbey Road studios, the Beatles recorded the ‘White Album’ classic “Helter Skelter.” Eighteen takes, lasting approximately five minutes each were recorded; and the last take was featured on the original LP. It’s reported that after that 18th take, Ringo Starr flung his drum sticks across the studio and screamed, “I got blisters on my fingers!” Also reported that John Lennon played bass and honked on a saxophone, roadie Mal Evans tried his best at playing trumpet. Paul McCartney recorded his lead vocal and George Harrison ran about the studio holding a flaming ashtray above his head.

 

 

 
bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbOn September 9, 1978, “Beast of Burden” by the Rolling Stones was released. The song was released as the second single off the album ‘Some Girls.’ It charted at #8 in the US and in 2004, Rolling Stone magazine ranked the song #435 on their list of “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time” and #433 on the 500 Greatest Rock and Roll Songs of All Time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kiss_alive_album_coverOn September 10, 1975, KISS released their breakthrough and a landmark for live album ‘Alive.’ was released by KISS. The double-disc set contains live versions of tracks from their first three studio albums, ‘Kiss,’ ‘ Hotter Than Hell’ and ‘Dressed to Kill’ and was recorded from concerts in Detroit, Michigan; Cleveland, Ohio; Wildwood, New Jersey; and Davenport, Iowa.

 

 

 

 

220px-Smells_Like_Teen_SpiritOn September 10, 1991, Nirvana’s single ‘Smells Like Teen Spirit’ was released in the US. It is the opening track and lead single from the band’s second album, ‘Nevermind.’ The now legendary cut was written by Kurt Cobain, Krist Novoselic, and Dave Grohl and produced by Butch Vig. The success of the song propelled Nevermind to the top of the charts at the start of 1992, an event often marked as the point where alternative rock entered the mainstream. The song peaked at reaching number six on the Billboard Hot 100 and is ranked as #9 in Rolling Stone’s “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.”

 

 

 

 

 

220px-MMT_posterOn September 11, 1967, filming began for the Beatles ‘Magical Mystery Tour.’ The film was unscripted and shooting proceeded on the basis of a mostly handwritten collection of ideas, sketches and situations, which Paul McCartney called the “Scrupt.” The ‘Magical Mystery Tour’ bus set off for the West Country in England stopping for the night in Teignmouth, Devon were hundreds of fans greeted the fab four at their hotel.

 

 

 

 
220px-Single_Peace_On_Earth-Little_Drummer_Boy_coverOn September 11, 1977, David Bowie and Bing Crosby recorded a duet version of “The Little Drummer Boy” for Crosby’s then-upcoming television special called Bing Crosby’s Merrie Olde Christmas. The unlikely duo exchanged scripted dialogue about what they each do for their family Christmases, before singing “Little Drummer Boy” with a new counterpoint with original lyrics written for the special, “Peace on Earth.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

monkees_lOn September 12, 1966, the Monkees TV show premiered on NBC. The series was filmed by Screen Gems, and many of the same sets and props from the Three Stooges short films made by the studio were used on rock and roll parody show. The theme song to the Monkees, released as the single “(Theme From) The Monkees” in 1967, is one of the group’s most well known songs. The Monkees won two Emmy Awards in 1967: Outstanding Comedy Series and Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Comedy (James Frawley).

 

 

 
220px-Aerosmith_PumpOn September 12, 1989, Aerosmith released their tenth studio album ‘Pump.’ It featured the hit singles, “Love In An Elevator,” “The Other Side” and “Janie’s Got a Gun.” The LP album has certified sales of seven million copies in the US. It produced their first Grammy Award (“Janie’s Got a Gun”) and “Love in an Elevator” became the first Aerosmith song to hit #1 on the Mainstream Rock Tracks chart. The album was the fourth bestselling album of the year 1990.

 

 

 

 

JohnnyCash1969On September 12, 2003, singer songwriter Johnny Cash died of respiratory failure aged 71. One of the most influential musicians of the 20th century, known as “The Man in Black.” He traditionally started his concerts by saying, “Hello, I’m Johnny Cash.” In 1999, Cash received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. In 2004, Rolling Stone ranked Cash No. 31 on their “100 Greatest Artists of All Time” list.

 

 

 

 

 
220px-Beatles-singles-yesterdayOn September 13, 1965, Yesterday/Act Naturally” was released by the Beatles. Although credited to “Lennon–McCartney,” the song was written solely by Paul McCartney. Broadcast Music Incorporated (BMI) asserts that it was performed over seven million times in the 20th century alone and it remains popular today with more than 2,200 cover versions, and is one of the most covered songs in the history of recorded music. The song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1997.

 

 

 
220px-We_Are_the_World_alternative_coverOn September 13, 1985, “We Are The World” won Best Group Video and the Viewer’s Choice at the MTV Video Music Awards in New York. Don Henley’s “The Boys Of Summer” video won four trophies, including Best Video. Bruce Springsteen’s “I’m On Fire” gets the nod for Best Male Video and Tina Turner won Best Female Video for “What’s Love Got To Do With It.”

 

 

 

 

 

 
littleOn September 14, 1955, Little Richard entered a New Orleans recording studio to begin two days of recording. Things were not going well and during a break, Richard and his producer; Bumps Blackwell went to the Dew Drop Inn for lunch. Richard started playing the piano in the bar like crazy, singing a loud and lewd version of “Tutti Frutti.” So, with only fifteen minutes left in the session, Richard recorded the song and coined the phrase, “a-wop-bop-a-loo-bop-a-lop-bam-boom.” The song managed to make it into the US Top 20 early the following year, but a cover by Pat Boone over shadowed Richard’s version on the pop chart.

 

 

 

220px-Sugar,_sugarOn September 14, 1968, the first episode of the comic strip “The Archies” aired on US television. The recording group had contributions from Ron Dante, Andy Kim, Jeff Barry and others and Don Kirshner (who also brought us The Monkees), was put in charge of the studio group. The following year, the Archies released “Sugar Sugar,” which reached #1 in the US and the UK in 1969.

 

 

 

 

220px-Quadrophenia_movieOn September 14, 1979, the film Quadrophenia was released. Based on the Who’s 1973 rock opera, the film featured Phil Daniels, Toyah Willcox, Ray Winstone, Michael Elphick and Sting.

 

 

 

 

 
busOn September 14, 2005, the newly refurbished Grateful Dead’s original tour bus went on display at the Volo Auto Museum in Volo, Illinois. The 1965 Gillig bus, which Jerry Garcia and the rest of the Dead dubbed ‘Sugar Magnolia’ was used by the band on their frequent tours across the US between 1967 and 1985. The ceiling was lined with hundreds of vintage rock posters featuring the Beatles, Jimi Hendrix, Janice Joplin and others who had visited the bus.

 

 

This Week In Music History – September 1 – September 7

Rock-and-roll-hall-of-fame-sunsetOn September 1, 1995, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame opened in Cleveland, Ohio, with the ribbon being cut by an ensemble that included Yoko Ono and Little Richard, among others, before a crowd of more than 10,000 people. The following night an all-star concert was held at the stadium. It featured Chuck Berry, Bob Dylan, Al Green, Jerry Lee Lewis, Aretha Franklin, Bruce Springsteen, Iggy Pop, John Fogerty, John Mellencamp and many others. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum’s Library and Archives is the world’s most comprehensive repository of materials related to the history of rock and roll.

 

 

 

 
220px-Styx_-_Pieces_of_EightOn September 1, 1978, Styx released their eighth studio album ‘Pieces of Eight.’ The LP achieved triple-platinum certification, thanks to the hit singles “Sing for the Day,” “Blue Collar Man (Long Nights)” and “Renegade.” The album’s cover was done by Hipgnosis.

 

 

 

 

 

 
angelsOn September 2, 1963, the Angels become the first white all-female group to have a number-one record with the legendary girl group cut “My Boyfriend’s Back.”

 

 

 

 

 

ELM_52On September 2, 1972, the Erie Canal Soda Pop Festival was held over three days on Bull Island, near Griffin, Indiana. The promoters expected up to 50,000 music fans however, more than 200,000 attended the festival. Acts that appeared included Flash Cadillac & the Continental Kids, Black Oak Arkansas, Cheech and Chong, Foghat, Albert King, Brownsville Station, Canned Heat, Flash, Ravi Shankar, Rory Gallagher, Lee Michaels and Frosty, the Eagles, the Amboy Dukes, and Gentle Giant. Three concert goers drowned in the Wabash River and as the festival ended, the remnants of the crowd burned down the music stand.

 

 

 

 

 

usfest2On September 3, 1982, Steve Wozniak, the founder of the Apple Computer Company, sponsors a three day music Festival in San Bernardino, California, featuring The Grateful Dead, Jackson Browne, Eddie Money, Talking Heads, Fleetwood Mac, Dave Edmunds, Santana, the B-52′s, The Kinks, The Police, The Cars, Tom Petty and others. Even though the event was attended by over 400,000 people and took in $10 million, the concert still ended up losing money.

 

 

 

 

220px-96tearsalbumOn September 3, 1966, Question Mark And The Mysterians’ “96 Tears” made its debut on Billboard’s Hot 100, where it will eventually reach number one.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
BEATLES111On September 4, 1962, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr begin recording together for the first time at EMI’s St. John Studio. They laid down six songs including “Love Me Do” and “P.S. I Love You.”

 

 

 

 

 
Ya-Ya's_Out!_The_Rolling_Stones_in_ConcertOn September 4, 1970, ‘Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out!,’ a live album by the Rolling Stones, was released on Decca Records in the UK and on London Records in the US. It was recorded in New York and Maryland in November 1969. The title of the album was adapted from the song “Get Yer Yas Yas Out” by Blind Boy Fuller.

 

 

 

 

 
Paul_McCartney_during_a_Wings_concert,_1976On September 4, 1971, Paul McCartney scored his second solo, #1 hit in the US with “Uncle Albert / Admiral Halsey.” Paul explained that “Uncle Albert” was based on his real-life uncle. “He’s someone I recall fondly and when the song was coming, it was like a nostalgia thing… As for Admiral Halsey, he’s one of yours, an American admiral,” referring to Admiral William “Bull” Halsey.

 

 

 

 

 

 
the-doors-456-012913On September 5, 1968, on their first visit to the UK, the Doors appeared on Top of The Pops and performed their hit “Hello I Love You” live on the TV show.

 

 

 

 

 

Janis_Joplin_seated_1970On September 5, 1970, Janis Joplin started recording sessions that included recording a version of the Kris Kristofferson/Fred Foster song “Me and Bobby McGee.” Joplin’s version topped the US singles chart in 1971 after her death, making the song the second posthumous #1 single in US chart history after ‘(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay’ by Otis Redding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

jimiOn September 6, 1970, Jimi Hendrix made his final concert appearance when he appeared at the Isle Of Fehmarn in Germany. The guitarist died on Sept 18, 1970.

 

 

 

 

 

Eric_Clapton2_in_1978On September 6, 1968, Eric Clapton recorded the guitar solo for the Beatles’ song “While My Guitar Gently Weeps.” George Harrison had asked his friend to add a lead guitar solo to the song. Clapton was reluctant; and said, “Nobody ever plays on the Beatles’ records,’ however Harrison convinced him and Clapton’s solo, using Harrison’s Gibson Les Paul electric guitar “Lucy” (a recent gift from Clapton), was recorded that evening.

 

 

 

 

 

 
Sam_Cooke_2On September 7, 1957, Sam Cooke released his first single “You Send Me.” The song has become a landmark record of the soul genre and was named as one of the 500 most important rock and roll recordings by the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

 

 

 

 

 
Led-Zep-first-performance-7th-sept--1968On September 7, 1968, Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones and John Bonham made their live debut as Led Zeppelin but were billed as the New Yardbirds at Teen Club in Gladsaxe (a suburb in the outskirts of Copenhagen, Denmark). Around 1,200 youngsters attended the show.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
moonOn September 7, 1978, Keith Moon, drummer for the Who, died in London after overdosing on Hemenephirin (prescribed to combat alcoholism) at the age of 31. Moon played on all the Who albums from their debut, 1965′s ‘My Generation’ to 1978′s ‘Who Are You.’

 

 

 

This Week In Music History – August 11 – August 17

BookerT_&theMG'sGreenOnionsOn August 11, 1962, Booker T. and the MG’s song, “Green Onions,” was released. The instrumental cut was ranked #183 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 greatest songs of all time. In 1999 “Green Onions” was given a Grammy Hall of Fame Award and in 2012 it was added to the Library of Congress’s National Recording Registry list of “culturally, historically, or aesthetically important” American sound recordings.

 

 

 

kisssssIn August of 1973, after seeing KISS play at a New York hotel, producer Bill Aucoin offered to become their manager and promised a record deal. With the help of Aucoin, KISS becomes the first act signed to Bogart’s new label, Casablanca Records.

 

 

 

 

RayParkerJrGhostbusters7InchSingleCoverOn August 11, 1984, Ray Parker JR. started a three week run at #1 on the US singles chart with the theme from the film ‘Ghostbusters’. It was nominated at the Academy Award for Best Music, Original Song, but lost to Stevie Wonder’s “I Just Called to Say I Love You.” Parker who had been a session guitarist for Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye was accused of plagiarizing the melody from Huey Lewis and the News song “I Want a New Drug,” resulting in Lewis suing Parker, the pair settled out of court in 1985.

 

 

 

 

 
LedZeppelin1971Promo_fullpageOn August 12, 1968, Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones and John Bonham played together for the first time when they rehearsed in a small basement room on Gerrard Street just south of London’s Soho district. The first song they played was a version of “Train Kept A-Rollin’.” They also played “Smokestack Lightning” and a version of “I’m Confused” (soon to become “Dazed And Confused”). The first live dates they played were as the Yardbirds, and it was not until the following month when they started to use the name Led Zeppelin.

 

 

 

CheapthrillsOn August 12, 1968, Big Brother and the Holding Company (with Janis Joplin as primary lead vocalist) released the legendary album ‘Cheap Thrills.’ It reached #1 on the Billboard charts in its eighth week in October. It kept the #1 spot for eight (nonconsecutive) weeks while the single, “Piece of My Heart” also became a huge hit. By the end of the year it was the most successful album of 1968, having sold nearly a million copies. The cover was drawn by cartoonist R. Crumb (the band’s original cover idea, a picture of the group naked in bed together, was dropped by the record company). Crumb had originally intended his art for the LP back cover, with a portrait of Joplin on the front. But Joplin, an avid fan of underground comics, and especially the work of Crumb, so loved the Cheap Thrills illustration that she demanded Columbia Records place it on the front cover. It is #9 on Rolling Stone’s list of one hundred greatest album covers.

 

Woodstock_'94_posterOn August 12, 1994, Woodstock ’94 opened in Saugerties, New York on the 25th anniversary of the Woodstock Music and Art Fair. More than 30 acts performed at the three-day event, including Red Hot Chili Peppers, Sheryl Crow, Aerosmith, Metallica, and Nine Inch Nails, for a crowd estimated at between 235,000 and 350,000 people.

 

 

 

 

 

 
supremes_Baby_loveOn August 13, 1964, in Studio A at Hitsville U.S.A. in Detroit, the Supremes recorded “Baby Love.” Considered one of the most popular songs of the late 20th century, “Baby Love” was ranked #324 on the Rolling Stone list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. It was also the second of five Supremes songs in a row to go to number-one in the United States, reaching the top spot of the Billboard Hot 100 on October 31, 1964, and staying there for four weeks

 

 

 

250px-Jefferson_Airplane_early_1966On August 13, 1965, Jefferson Airplane made their live debut at San Francisco’s Matrix Club. In the audience that night was future Jefferson Airplane/Starship member Grace Slick.The photograph of the members of Jefferson Airplane that was featured on the front cover of their best-known album, ‘Surrealistic Pillow’ (1967), was taken inside the Matrix.

 

 

 

American_Woman45On August 13, 1969, at the RCA studios in Chicago, the Guess Who recorded “American Woman.” The song originated from their live jam at a curling rink concert in Kitchener, Ontario, with lead singer Burton Cummings improvising lyrics to fit the music. Shortly after its release, the Guess Who were invited to play at the White House. Because of its supposed anti-American lyrics, Pat Nixon asked that they not play “American Woman.” The song is noted for its memorable anti-American line. “I don’t want your war machines/I don’t need your ghetto scenes.” The song hit #1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

 

 

 

 
220px-The_McCoysOn August 14, 1965, the McCoys’ “Hang On Sloopy” was released. It will enter the Hot 100 three weeks later and top the chart by the first week of October. It was written by Wes Farrell and Bert Russell, originally titled “My Girl Sloopy.” It was named for singer Dorothy Sloop, who used the name “Sloopy” on stage. It was first recorded by the Vibrations in 1964, for Atlantic Records (45-2222), becoming a top-30 hit.

 

 

 

MaggiereasonOn August 14, 1971, Rod Stewart’s “Maggie May” was released in the US, where it will reach #1 and become his first Billboard chart hit. It was initially released as the B-side of the single “Reason to Believe,” but DJs in the USA (possibly in Cleveland, Ohio) became fonder of the B-side and the song was reclassified, with “Maggie May” becoming the A-side. Stewart would later remark: “I cannot see how the single is such a hit. It has no melody.” In 2004, Rolling Stone ranked the song #130 on their list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

 

 

 

Rock_n_MeOn August 14, 1976, Steve Miller released “Rock ‘N Me,” one of his three hit singles not credited to the Steve Miller Band. The song was released as the second single from the group’s ninth studio album ‘Fly Like an Eagle’ in 1976. The North American release of the single was credited to Steve Miller, while the European release was credited as Steve Miller Band. The song was the band’s second #1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100, where it stayed at the top for 1 week.

 

 

 

 

 

220px-Raccoon_climbing_in_tree_-_Cropped_and_color_correctedOn August 15, 1968, at EMI’s Abbey Road Studios in London, the Beatles recorded the Paul McCartney composition “Rocky Raccoon,” the last Beatles song to feature John Lennon playing harmonica. Producer George Martin played the honky-tonk piano. In Mojo magazine in October, 2008, McCartney acknowledged that the style of the song is a pastiche, saying, “I was basically spoofing the folksinger.” Lennon attributed the song to Paul, saying “Couldn’t you guess? Would I have gone to all that trouble about Gideon’s Bible and all that stuff?” Paul McCartney was inspired while playing acoustic guitar with John Lennon and Donovan in India (where the Beatles had gone on a retreat).

 

 

 

woodstockOn August 15, 1969, Woodstock Festival was held on Max Yasgur’s 600 acre farm in Bethel outside New York. The event was scheduled: August 15–17, 1969. Attended by over 400,000 people, it featured the music of, Jimi Hendrix, Joe Cocker, Crosby Stills Nash & Young, Santana, the Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Grateful Dead, Janis Joplin, the Band, Canned Heat, Joan Baez, Melanie, Ten Years After, Sly and the Family Stone, Johnny Winter, Jefferson Airplane, Ravi Shanker, Country Joe and the Fish, Blood Sweat and Tears, Arlo Guthrie, and Joe Cocker. During the three days there were three deaths, two births and four miscarriages. Joni Mitchell was booked to appear but had to pull out due to being booked for a TV show, wrote the song “Woodstock.”

 

 

 

 
elvisPresleyAlohafromHawaiiOn August 16, 1977, at his Graceland home in Memphis, Elvis Presley took the book he’d been reading, Frank Adams’ “The Scientific Search For The Face Of Jesus,” and went into his bathroom.

“Don’t fall asleep in there,” said girlfriend Ginger Alden, knowing he had a habit of nodding off.

“Okay, I won’t,” he said. Ginger went back to sleep.

At 1:30 p.m. CST, Ginger awoke and saw Elvis was still gone. When knocking on the bathroom door produced no reply, she entered and found his lifeless body on the floor in front of the toilet.

Alden called for Elvis associates Joe Esposito and Al Strada, who arrived and called the fire department. An ambulance was dispatched. Daughter Lisa Marie and father Vernon arrived in the bathroom, but Lisa Marie was quickly removed. Elvis was rushed to Baptist Memorial Hospital, where, after several attempts to revive him, he died at 3:30 p.m. CST.

His autopsy was performed at 7:00 p.m. The official coroner’s report listed “cardiac arrhythmia” as the cause of Presley’s death, but this was later admitted to be a ruse by the Presley family with the help of autopsy physicians to cover up the real cause of death: a cocktail of ten prescribed drugs, taken together in doses no doctor would ever prescribe.

The phrase “cardiac arrhythmia,” in the context of the coroner’s report, means little more than a stopped heart; the report initially tried to attribute the arrhythmia to cardiovascular disease, but Elvis’ own personal physician has stated that Presley had no such chronic problems at the time. Most of Elvis’ many health problems can and have been traced back to rampant abuse of prescription drugs.

The painkillers Morphine and Demerol. Chloropheniramine, an antihistamine. The tranquilizers Placidyl and Vailum. Finally, four drugs were found in “significant” quantities: Codeine, an opiate, Ethinamate, largely prescribed at the time as a “sleeping pill,” Quaaludes, and a barbituate, or depressant, that has never been identified. It has also been rumored that Diazepam, Amytal, Nembutal, Carbrital, Sinutab, Elavil, Avental, and Valmid were found in his system at death.

The phrase “cardiac arrhythmia,” in the context of the coroner’s report, means little more than a stopped heart; the report initially tried to attribute the arrhythmia to cardiovascular disease, but Elvis’ own personal physician has stated that Presley had no such chronic problems at the time.

He left an estate valued at 4.9 million dollars, which by 1993 had grown to between 50 and 100 million.

 

200px-Everly_Brothers_-_CroppedOn August 16, 1957, at RCA’s McGavock Street studios in Nashville, the Everly Brothers recorded “Wake Up Little Susie.” The song reached #1 on the Billboard Pop chart and the Cash Box Best Selling Records chart, despite having been banned from Boston radio stations for lyrics that, at the time, were considered “suggestive.” It was ranked at #311 on the Rolling Stone magazine’s list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

 

 

 

 

last_Train_to_Clarksville_coverOn August 16, 1966, the Monkees released their first single, “Last Train to Clarksville.” The song refers to Clarksville, Tennessee, which is in close proximity to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, the home of the 101st Airborne Division which flew numerous missions over Vietnam during the Vietnam War. The song topped the Billboard Hot 100 on November 5, 1966.

 

 

 

 

ramonesOn August 16, 1974, the Ramones made their live debut at CBGB in New York. Despite achieving only limited commercial success, the band was a major influence on the punk rock movement in both the US and, perhaps to a greater extent, in the UK.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the-beatles-353x-353xOn August 17, 1960, in Hamburg, Germany, the Beatles began the first of 48 nights performing at the Indra Club, on stage for 4½ hours on weekdays, 6 hours on weekends. The arrangement led to 20-minute versions of songs like “Long Tall Sally.” The club owner, Bruno Koschmider, told the Beatles to “mach shau,” or really put on a show, which led to the band screaming, shouting, and leaping about the stage and sometimes playing while lying on the floor. John Lennon often yelled at the German audiences, called them Nazis, shouted “Sieg Heil!” at them, and wore outlandish outfits. One time he appeared on stage in only his underwear, and another time he had a toilet seat around his neck. The young crowd loved it. The Beatles eventually broke their contract and moved to the Top Ten Club. Koschmider exacted his revenge by getting George Harrison deported for being too young to play in bars, and Paul and Pete Best deported for starting a fire in the tiny room the group shared behind a screen in a local movie house.

 

 

jimihendrix-x600-1405632252On August 17, 1969, on the final day of the three-day Woodstock festival in Bethel, New York, there were performances by Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, the Who, Jimi Hendrix, Ten Years After, John Sebastian, Sha Na Na, Joe Cocker, Country Joe and the Fish, the Band, Ten Years After, Johnny Winter and the Paul Butterfield Blues Band.

 

 

 

 

nnnnnnnnnnnOn August 17, 1991, Nirvana shot the video for “Smells Like Teen Spirit” at GMT Studios in Culver City, California, costing less than $50,000 to make, the shoot features real Nirvana fans as the audience. The video won Nirvana the Best New Artist and Best Alternative Group awards at the 1992 MTV Video Music Awards, and in 2000 the Guinness World Records named ‘Teen Spirit’ the Most Played Video on MTV Europe.

 

 

 

This Week In Music History – June 9 -15

Some_GirlsOn June 9, 1978, ‘Some Girls‘ was released by the Rolling Stones. It peaked at #1 on the Billboard 200, and became one of the band’s biggest-selling albums in the US, and has been certified by the RIAA as having six million copies sold as of 2000. The album cover for was designed by Peter Corriston, with illustrations by Hubert Kretzschmar. An elaborate die-cut design, with colors varying on different sleeves, it featured band in garish drag alongside select female celebrities and lingerie ads. The cover immediately ran into trouble when Lucille Ball, Farrah Fawcett, Liza Minnelli (representing her mother Judy Garland), Raquel Welch, and the estate of Marilyn Monroe threatened legal action. The album was quickly reissued with a revised cover that removed all the celebrities whether they had complained or not, and were replaced with black and punk style garish colors with the phrase PARDON OUR APPEARANCE – COVER UNDER RE-CONSTRUCTION (found on most reissues since).

 

220px-InvisibleTouch86On June 9, 1986 the album ‘Invisible Touch’ was released by Genesis. It reached #1 in the UK where it remained in the charts for 96 weeks, making it by far the most commercially successful album of their career, certified 6x platinum in the US and 4x platinum in the UK; eventually selling over 15 million copies worldwide. It received generally favorable reviews from critics and produced five US Top 5 singles, including the title track which reached the #1 spot on the US chart, the only song by Genesis to do so.

 

 

 

 
Janis_Lyn_JoplinOn June 10, 1966, Big Brother & the Holding Company made their first live appearance in San Francisco at the Avalon with new lead singer Janis Joplin.

 

 

 

 

 
The_Eagles_-_One_of_These_NightsOn June 10, 1975, the Eagles released their fourth studio album, ‘One Of These Nights.’ The album released three Top 10 singles, “One of These Nights,” “Lyin’ Eyes” and “Take It To The Limit.” Those singles reached #1, #2, and #4 respectively. The album became the band’s first album to top the charts. The album sold 4 million copies and won the band its first Grammy for “Lyin’ Eyes.” The album was the band’s breakthrough album, transforming them to international superstars.

 

 

 
220px-R_E_M__-_Fables_of_the_ReconstructionOn June 10, 1985, R.E.M. released ‘Fables of the Reconstruction.’ The LP reached #28 in the US (going gold in 1991) and was the band’s best showing yet in the UK, peaking at #35. Peter Buck, in the liner notes of the 25th Anniversary Deluxe edition, said, “Over the years, a certain misapprehension about Fables of the Reconstruction has built up. For some reason, people have the impression that the members of R.E.M. don’t like the record. Nothing could be further from the truth. [...] It’s a personal favorite, and I’m really proud of how strange it is. Nobody but R.E.M. could have made that record.”

 

 

 

 

elvisTeddyOn June 11, 1957, Elvis Presley released the single “Let Me Be Your Teddy Bear” b/w “Loving You.” The song was a US number-one hit for Elvis Presley during the summer of 1957, staying at #1 for 7 weeks, and his third of the four that he would have that year. “(Let Me be Your) Teddy Bear” would also hit number one on the R&B Best Sellers List, becoming his fourth number one on that chart.

 

 

 
Manfred_mann_do_wah_diddy_diddyOn June 11, 1964, Manfred Mann recorded “Do Wah Diddy Diddy.” The now legendary cut (and bar band and wedding band staple) was released on July 10 and spent two weeks #1 in the UK Singles Chart in August and two weeks at the #1 spot in the US Billboard Hot 100 in October.

 

 

 

 

dark_side_of_the_moonOn June 11, 2011, Pink Floyd‘s 1973 album ‘The Dark Side Of The Moon,’ re-entered the Billboard Album chart at #47, and reached the milestone of 1,000 weeks on Billboard’s charts. The album, which was released in 1973, has done consistently well reaching #1 on more than one occasion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Surfer_Girl_coverOn June 12, 1963, at Western Studios in Los Angeles, the Beach Boys recorded “Little Deuce Coupe” and “Surfer Girl.” The latter, was written solely by Brian Wilson, the song is his very first composition. Although the song is sometimes referred to as a tribute to his then girlfriend Judy Bowles, this is untrue as the song wasn’t written with anyone particular in mind. It was the first Beach Boys recording session where Brian Wilson served as the official producer.

 

 

 
MariahCarey-MCcoverOn June 12, 1990, Mariah Carey released her self-titled debut album. Five singles were released from the album, four of which became number-one hits on the Hot 100. The album was certified nine-times platinum by the RIAA, denoting shipments of over nine million copies in the United States. The album experienced similar success in Canada, where it topped the charts and was certified seven-times platinum.

 

 

 
220px-John-Lennon-Darfur-v2On June 12, 2007, the 21 song John Lennon tribute album “Instant Karma: The Amnesty International Campaign To Save Darfur” was released. The set contains Jackson Browne’s rendition of “Oh My Love,” as well as contributions from Green Day, U2, Aerosmith and R.E.M. who provide the compilation’s first single, “#9 Dream,” featuring the band’s founding drummer, Bill Berry. Proceeds go to Amnesty International’s initiative against the Darfur genocide.

 

 

 

 
Frank_Sinatra_laughingOn June 13, 1971, Frank Sinatra performed his “retirement” concert at the Ahmanson Theater in Los Angeles, a benefit performance marking the 50th anniversary of the Motion Picture And Television Relief Fund. His 11-song set ended with the song “Angel Eyes” and its last line, “‘S’cuse me … while I … disappear,” after which the spotlight that had been reduced to illuminate only his face was extinguished. Sinatra returned a year and a half later with the legendary comeback album “Ol’ Blue Eyes Is Back.”

 

 

 
candy-O_-_The_CarsOn June 13, 1979, ‘Candy-O‘ by the Cars was released. The album cover was painted by artist Alberto Vargas, known for his paintings of pin-up girls that appeared in Esquire and Playboy magazines in the 1940s and 1960s. The idea to hire Vargas came from drummer David Robinson, the band’s artistic director and a collector of pin-ups. The 83-year-old Vargas had retired several years earlier but was persuaded to take the assignment by his niece, who was a fan of the Cars. The painting, depicting a girl sprawled across the hood of a car, was based on a photo shoot directed by Robinson at a Ferrari dealership.

 

 

 

alanis_Morissette_-_Jagged_Little_PillOn June 13, 1995, Alanis Morissette released the album ‘Jagged Little Pill.’ It became a commercial and critical success, selling over 33 million copies worldwide. The album produced six singles, including the Grammy nominated “Ironic.” In October 2002, Rolling Stone ranked it #31 on its Women In Rock – The 50 Essential Albums list, and in 2003 the magazine ranked it #327 on its list of The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

 

 

 

 
BeatlesVIalbumcoverOn June 14,1965, the Beatles released the album ‘Beatles VI.’ It was the seventh Capitol Records release in the US (including The Beatles’ Story). It was the ninth album released into that market in less than one and a half years (Vee-Jay Records and United Artists Records also released one album each during that period). The LP was released in both mono and stereo versions. ‘Beatles VI’ reached #1 in Billboard for six weeks, beginning on July 10, 1965.

 

 

 

 

220px-In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida

On June 14, 1968, the legendary LP ‘In-a-Gadda-Da-Vida’ by Iron Butterfly was released. It peaked at #4 on the Billboard charts and was given the distinction of being the first album to be awarded platinum status when the RIAA began that achievement level in 1976. Today it is a 4x platinum album with sales of over 30 million copies. It was also Atlantic Records’ biggest selling album until it was surpassed by Led Zeppelin IV.

 

 

 
On June220px-Grateful_Dead_-_Workingman's_Dead 14, 1970, the Grateful Dead released the LP ‘Workingman’s Dead.’ The title of the album comes from a comment from Jerry Garcia to lyricist Robert Hunter about how “this album was turning into the Workingman’s Dead version of the band.” In 2003, the album was ranked #262 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

 

 

 
220px-Emerson,_Lake_&_Palmer_-_Tarkus_(1971)_front_coverOn June 14, 1971, Emerson, Lake and Palmer released the LP ‘Tarkus ‘in the UK on Island Records, appearing two months later in the US on Cotillion Records. It’s one of only two ELP records to reach the Top 10 in the States, making it to #9 (Trilogy, the following year, got to #5), while in Britain it’s their only number-one album. Additionally, Tarkus spent a total of 17 weeks in the UK Albums Chart. In Japan the album was released on Atlantic Records. Later vinyl reissues were on the Manticore label.

 

 

 

 

LikeaRollingStoneOn June 15, 1965, in New York, Bob Dylan began a two-day recording session that produced his classic “Like A Rolling Stone.” The fourth of 15 takes on the second day was the version released as the single. The track has been described as revolutionary in its combination of different musical elements, the youthful, cynical sound of Dylan’s voice, and the directness of the question in the chorus: “How does it feel?”. The cut transformed Dylan’s career and is today considered one of the most influential compositions in post-war popular music. The song has been covered by numerous artists, varying from The Jimi Hendrix Experience, The Rolling Stones, The Wailers to Green Day. In 2011, Rolling Stone magazine placed “Like a Rolling Stone” at the top of their list of “500 Greatest Songs Of All Time.” In 2006, Pitchfork Media placed it at number 4 on their list of “The 200 Greatest Songs of the 1960s”.

 

 

220px-Bob_Dylan_-_Street-LegalOn June 15, 1978, ‘Street Legal’ by Bob Dylan was released. It was another gold record for Dylan, but it peaked at only #11 on the US Billboard charts, making it his first studio album to miss the US Top 10 since 1964.

 

 

 

 
220px-Nirvana-BleachOn June 15, 1989, Nirvana‘s debut album ‘Bleach‘ was released in the US. The title for the album came from a poster ‘Bleach Your Works’ urging drug users to bleach their needles. Kurt Cobain claimed that most of the lyrics on the album were written the night before recording while he was feeling “pissed off,” and that he did not regard them highly. The album cover was photographed by Cobain’s then-girlfriend Tracy Marander during a concert at the Reko Muse art gallery in Olympia, Washington.