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Archive for the ‘Monkees’ Category.

This Week In Music History – September 8 – September 14

beatles1964montreal2On September 8, 1964, the Beatles performed at the Montreal Forum, the 16th city of their famous 1964 North American Tour. The Beatles gave a matinee performance to 9,500 fans in the afternoon followed by a sold-out evening concert before a crowd of 11,500. Opening acts included the Righteous Brothers, Jackie de Shannon, the Bill Black Combo, and the Exciters.

 

 

 

220px-BrothersandsistersallmanbrotherOn September 8, 1973, the Allman Brothers started a five week run at #1 on the US album chart with ‘Brothers And Sisters.’ The artwork was taken at “the Farm” in Juliette, Georgia and the front features drummer Butch Trucks’ son Vaylor and the back cover featured Berry Oakley’s daughter Brittany. The gate fold spread reveals a photo of the band and their extended families.

 

 

 

 

 

 

adollshouse_300x300On September 9, 1968, while working at Abbey Road studios, the Beatles recorded the ‘White Album’ classic “Helter Skelter.” Eighteen takes, lasting approximately five minutes each were recorded; and the last take was featured on the original LP. It’s reported that after that 18th take, Ringo Starr flung his drum sticks across the studio and screamed, “I got blisters on my fingers!” Also reported that John Lennon played bass and honked on a saxophone, roadie Mal Evans tried his best at playing trumpet. Paul McCartney recorded his lead vocal and George Harrison ran about the studio holding a flaming ashtray above his head.

 

 

 
bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbOn September 9, 1978, “Beast of Burden” by the Rolling Stones was released. The song was released as the second single off the album ‘Some Girls.’ It charted at #8 in the US and in 2004, Rolling Stone magazine ranked the song #435 on their list of “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time” and #433 on the 500 Greatest Rock and Roll Songs of All Time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kiss_alive_album_coverOn September 10, 1975, KISS released their breakthrough and a landmark for live album ‘Alive.’ was released by KISS. The double-disc set contains live versions of tracks from their first three studio albums, ‘Kiss,’ ‘ Hotter Than Hell’ and ‘Dressed to Kill’ and was recorded from concerts in Detroit, Michigan; Cleveland, Ohio; Wildwood, New Jersey; and Davenport, Iowa.

 

 

 

 

220px-Smells_Like_Teen_SpiritOn September 10, 1991, Nirvana’s single ‘Smells Like Teen Spirit’ was released in the US. It is the opening track and lead single from the band’s second album, ‘Nevermind.’ The now legendary cut was written by Kurt Cobain, Krist Novoselic, and Dave Grohl and produced by Butch Vig. The success of the song propelled Nevermind to the top of the charts at the start of 1992, an event often marked as the point where alternative rock entered the mainstream. The song peaked at reaching number six on the Billboard Hot 100 and is ranked as #9 in Rolling Stone’s “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.”

 

 

 

 

 

220px-MMT_posterOn September 11, 1967, filming began for the Beatles ‘Magical Mystery Tour.’ The film was unscripted and shooting proceeded on the basis of a mostly handwritten collection of ideas, sketches and situations, which Paul McCartney called the “Scrupt.” The ‘Magical Mystery Tour’ bus set off for the West Country in England stopping for the night in Teignmouth, Devon were hundreds of fans greeted the fab four at their hotel.

 

 

 

 
220px-Single_Peace_On_Earth-Little_Drummer_Boy_coverOn September 11, 1977, David Bowie and Bing Crosby recorded a duet version of “The Little Drummer Boy” for Crosby’s then-upcoming television special called Bing Crosby’s Merrie Olde Christmas. The unlikely duo exchanged scripted dialogue about what they each do for their family Christmases, before singing “Little Drummer Boy” with a new counterpoint with original lyrics written for the special, “Peace on Earth.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

monkees_lOn September 12, 1966, the Monkees TV show premiered on NBC. The series was filmed by Screen Gems, and many of the same sets and props from the Three Stooges short films made by the studio were used on rock and roll parody show. The theme song to the Monkees, released as the single “(Theme From) The Monkees” in 1967, is one of the group’s most well known songs. The Monkees won two Emmy Awards in 1967: Outstanding Comedy Series and Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Comedy (James Frawley).

 

 

 
220px-Aerosmith_PumpOn September 12, 1989, Aerosmith released their tenth studio album ‘Pump.’ It featured the hit singles, “Love In An Elevator,” “The Other Side” and “Janie’s Got a Gun.” The LP album has certified sales of seven million copies in the US. It produced their first Grammy Award (“Janie’s Got a Gun”) and “Love in an Elevator” became the first Aerosmith song to hit #1 on the Mainstream Rock Tracks chart. The album was the fourth bestselling album of the year 1990.

 

 

 

 

JohnnyCash1969On September 12, 2003, singer songwriter Johnny Cash died of respiratory failure aged 71. One of the most influential musicians of the 20th century, known as “The Man in Black.” He traditionally started his concerts by saying, “Hello, I’m Johnny Cash.” In 1999, Cash received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. In 2004, Rolling Stone ranked Cash No. 31 on their “100 Greatest Artists of All Time” list.

 

 

 

 

 
220px-Beatles-singles-yesterdayOn September 13, 1965, Yesterday/Act Naturally” was released by the Beatles. Although credited to “Lennon–McCartney,” the song was written solely by Paul McCartney. Broadcast Music Incorporated (BMI) asserts that it was performed over seven million times in the 20th century alone and it remains popular today with more than 2,200 cover versions, and is one of the most covered songs in the history of recorded music. The song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1997.

 

 

 
220px-We_Are_the_World_alternative_coverOn September 13, 1985, “We Are The World” won Best Group Video and the Viewer’s Choice at the MTV Video Music Awards in New York. Don Henley’s “The Boys Of Summer” video won four trophies, including Best Video. Bruce Springsteen’s “I’m On Fire” gets the nod for Best Male Video and Tina Turner won Best Female Video for “What’s Love Got To Do With It.”

 

 

 

 

 

 
littleOn September 14, 1955, Little Richard entered a New Orleans recording studio to begin two days of recording. Things were not going well and during a break, Richard and his producer; Bumps Blackwell went to the Dew Drop Inn for lunch. Richard started playing the piano in the bar like crazy, singing a loud and lewd version of “Tutti Frutti.” So, with only fifteen minutes left in the session, Richard recorded the song and coined the phrase, “a-wop-bop-a-loo-bop-a-lop-bam-boom.” The song managed to make it into the US Top 20 early the following year, but a cover by Pat Boone over shadowed Richard’s version on the pop chart.

 

 

 

220px-Sugar,_sugarOn September 14, 1968, the first episode of the comic strip “The Archies” aired on US television. The recording group had contributions from Ron Dante, Andy Kim, Jeff Barry and others and Don Kirshner (who also brought us The Monkees), was put in charge of the studio group. The following year, the Archies released “Sugar Sugar,” which reached #1 in the US and the UK in 1969.

 

 

 

 

220px-Quadrophenia_movieOn September 14, 1979, the film Quadrophenia was released. Based on the Who’s 1973 rock opera, the film featured Phil Daniels, Toyah Willcox, Ray Winstone, Michael Elphick and Sting.

 

 

 

 

 
busOn September 14, 2005, the newly refurbished Grateful Dead’s original tour bus went on display at the Volo Auto Museum in Volo, Illinois. The 1965 Gillig bus, which Jerry Garcia and the rest of the Dead dubbed ‘Sugar Magnolia’ was used by the band on their frequent tours across the US between 1967 and 1985. The ceiling was lined with hundreds of vintage rock posters featuring the Beatles, Jimi Hendrix, Janice Joplin and others who had visited the bus.

 

 

This Week In Music History – August 18 – August 24

ringo-starr_010On August 18, 1962, Ringo Starr made his debut with the Beatles at the horticultural society Dance, Birkenhead, England, having had a two-hour rehearsal in preparation. This was the first appearance of the Beatles as the world would come to know them: John, Paul, George, and Ringo.

 

 

 

 

220px-Live_at_Woodstock

On August 18,1969, the Woodstock festival closes after morning performances by the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, Sha Na Na and finally, at 9 AM, Jimi Hendrix, who performs his rendition of “The Star Spangled Banner.”

 

 

 

 

 

220px-Bon_jovi_slippery_when_wetOn August 18, 1986, Bon Jovi released their third studio album, ‘Slippery When Wet,’ which peaked at #1 on the US charts, going on to sell over 28 million copies worldwide. The set featured two US chart toppers, “You Give Love A Bad Name” and “Livin’ On A Prayer.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bitches_brewOn August 19, 1969, at Columbia 30th Street Studios in New York City, jazz trumpeter Miles Davis began three days of recording sessions for the jazz-rock fusion album ‘Bitches Brew,’ which became his first Gold record. Chick Corea, Wayne Shorter and Joe Zawinul were among the musicians who took part in the groundbreaking recording. Upon release, it received a mixed response, due to the album’s unconventional style and revolutionary sound. Later, Bitches Brew gained recognition as one of jazz’s greatest albums and a progenitor of the jazz rock genre, as well as a major influence on rock and funk musicians.

 

 

 

The_Monkees_1966On August 19, 1968, the final “Monkees” TV show aired on NBC. The last song performed on the show was “Zor And Zam.” Since the its initial run, almost every major cable network has aired re-runs of the show, including a popular stint on CBS from 1969-1972 . The series was filmed by Screen Gems, and many of the same sets and props from the Three Stooges short films made by the studio were used on The Monkees.

 

 

 

 

Fleetwood_Mac_-_The_DanceOn August 19, 1997, Fleetwood Mac’s reunion album ‘The Dance’ was released. This was the last Fleetwood Mac album to feature Christine McVie, who departed the group a year after the album’s release. Debuting at #1 in the Billboard 200, the LPe became the fifth best-selling live album of all time in the US, with over 5 million copies sold. The concert was recorded for Fleetwood Mac’s MTV The Dance special at Warner Brothers Studios in Burbank, California on May 23, 1997, and features the University of Southern California Marching Band who perform on the tracks “Tusk” and “Don’t Stop.”

 

 

 

 

 

AbbeyRoad

On August 20, 1969, after finishing “I Want You, (She’s So Heavy),” the Beatles worked on the running order for the Abbey Road album. A preliminary master tape was compiled, the medley was originally slated for side one of the album, and the placement of “Octopus’s Garden” and “Oh! Darling” was reversed from the final version. The album was to end with the slashed guitar chord that finishes “I Want You (She’s So Heavy).” This was the last time all four Beatles were together in Abbey Road studios. (later three of the Beatles came together in the studio to overdub tracks from the ‘Let It Be’ sessions.)

 

 

 

On August 20240px-Mick_Jagger_in_red, 1973, the Rolling Stones released “Angie,” a Mick Jagger composition that is rumored to be written about David Bowie’s wife, Angela Barnett. In fact, the song was written almost entirely by Keith Richards, whose daughter Dandelion Angela had just been born, and the name was one of Richards’ contributions to the lyrics. Keith Richards has since written in his autobiography that Angie at the time was his nickname for heroin during his attempt to detox in Germany, to once and for all “say good by.” 

 

 

 

 

Prince_GraffitiOn August 20, 1990, Prince released his 12th studio album, the soundtrack for the Prince movie, ‘Graffiti Bridge.’ The album produced the hit singles “Thieves in the Temple” and “New Power Generation,” an anthem in two parts celebrating Prince’s newly created backing band, The New Power Generation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Patsy_Cline_II

On August 21, 1961, Patsy Cline recorded the classic Willie Nelson song, “Crazy.” She was still on crutches after going through a car windshield in a head-on collision two months earlier. It spent 21 weeks on the chart and eventually became one of her signature tunes. Nelson wrote the song in early 1961; at the time he was a journeyman singer-songwriter who had written several hits for other artists but had not yet had a significant recording of his own. Cline’s version is #85 on Rolling Stone’s list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

 

 

 

 

Eve-of-destruction

On August 21, 1965, Barry McGuire’s “Eve Of Destruction” was released. The single was released by Dunhill Records. The accompanying musicians who recorded the legendary cut were top-tier LA session players: P. F. Sloan on guitar, Hal Blaine on drums, and Larry Knechtel on bass. The vocal track was thrown on as a rough mix and was not intended to be the final version, but a copy of the recording “leaked” out to a DJ, who began playing it. The song was an instant hit and as a result the more polished vocal track that was at first envisioned was never recorded. The single hit #1 on the US Billboard Hot 100, and #3 on the UK Singles Chart.

 

 

 

220px-BeHereNowcover

On August 21, 1997, Oasis’ third album ‘Be Here Now’, became one of the fastest selling albums ever, selling over a million copies on the first day of release. As of 2008, the album had sold eight million copies worldwide.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VictorTalkingMachine2008

On August 22, 1906, the Victor Talking Machine Company of Camden, New Jersey began to manufacture the Victrola (record player). The hand-cranked unit, with horn cabinet, retailed for $200. Records were purchased separately, usually in the appliance stores that sold the machines, at a cost of between $1 and $7. Famed conductor John Philip Sousa predicted “a marked deterioration in American music” and said that generations of amateur musicians would give way to “canned music.”

 

 

 

 

Chipmunks_Beatles_USOn August 22, 1964, Liberty Records reported the album “The Chipmunks Sing the Beatles” was selling 25,000 copies a day. The stereo mix of the album mimics the stereo mixing of the early Beatles albums, with vocals predominantly in one channel and the instrumental backing in the other. In a December 1982 Goldmine magazine interview, Ross Bagdasarian, Jr. remembered that his father “thought it would be a cute idea for a Chipmunk record and he spoke with the Beatles. When he was in London, he even met the Beatles, who were very supportive of the idea.”

 

 

 

 

HeyjudealbumOn August 22, 1969, before filming a video for “The Long and Winding Road,” the Beatles held their last group photo shoot on the lawn of John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s home in Tittenhurst in Ascot, England. Three pictures from this session were used for the front and back covers of the compilation album ‘Hey Jude.’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beatles_-_She_Loves_YouOn August 23, 1963, the Beatles’ single “She Loves You” with “I’ll Get You” on the flip side is released in the UK. There was tremendous anticipation ahead of the release – thousands of fans had ordered the group’s next single as early as June, well before a title had been known. By the day before it went on sale, some 500,000 advanced orders had been placed for it. The single set several British sales records. It will enter the British charts on August 31st and remain there for thirty-one consecutive weeks, eighteen of those in the top three.

 

 

 

 

NothingsShockingOn Aug. 23, 1988,  Jane’s Addiction’s official studio debut ‘Nothing’s Shocking’ was released. It is often cited as the group’s best albums. But, despite this, it peaked at #103 on the Billboard 200. The single “Jane Says” reached #6 on the Billboard Modern Rock Tracks. The album was ranked #312 on Rolling Stone’s “500 Greatest Albums of All-Time.” Perry Farrell created the cover image which features a sculpture of a pair of nude female conjoined twins sitting on a sideways rocking chair with their heads on fire. Farrell said the image, like much of his artwork, came to him in a dream.

 

 

 

 

lovemetenderelvissingle

On August 24, 1956, at the 20th Century Fox Stage 1 in Los Angeles, Elvis Presley recorded his immortal cut “Love Me Tender.” The song hit #1 on the Billboard charts the week ending November 3, 1956, remaining in the position for 5 weeks and reached #11 on the charts in the UK. “Love Me Tender” also reached number three for three weeks on the R&B chart. It was also an achievement as “Love Me Tender” succeeded another Presley single, “Hound Dog/Don’t Be Cruel” at #1. This occurrence marked two important events in Billboard history. During this time, Elvis accomplished another record; the longest consecutive stay at number one by a single artist, sixteen weeks, though this was tied by Boyz II Men in 1994 and stood for eight years until being surpassed by R&B singer Usher in 2004 who spent 19 weeks at the top of the charts.

 

 

220px-TheDoorsTheDoorsalbumcover

On August 24, 1966, the Doors started recording their first album at Sunset Sound Recording Studios, West Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, California.

 

 

 

 

 

On AuQueengust 24, 1975, Queen started recording “Bohemian Rhapsody” at Rockfield studio’s in Monmouth, Wales – the song was recorded over three weeks). Freddie Mercury had mentally prepared the song beforehand and directed the band throughout the sessions. Brian May, Mercury and Roger Taylor sang their vocal parts continually for 10 to 12 hours a day, resulting in 180 separate overdubs.

 

 

 

 

This Week In Music History – August 11 – August 17

BookerT_&theMG'sGreenOnionsOn August 11, 1962, Booker T. and the MG’s song, “Green Onions,” was released. The instrumental cut was ranked #183 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 greatest songs of all time. In 1999 “Green Onions” was given a Grammy Hall of Fame Award and in 2012 it was added to the Library of Congress’s National Recording Registry list of “culturally, historically, or aesthetically important” American sound recordings.

 

 

 

kisssssIn August of 1973, after seeing KISS play at a New York hotel, producer Bill Aucoin offered to become their manager and promised a record deal. With the help of Aucoin, KISS becomes the first act signed to Bogart’s new label, Casablanca Records.

 

 

 

 

RayParkerJrGhostbusters7InchSingleCoverOn August 11, 1984, Ray Parker JR. started a three week run at #1 on the US singles chart with the theme from the film ‘Ghostbusters’. It was nominated at the Academy Award for Best Music, Original Song, but lost to Stevie Wonder’s “I Just Called to Say I Love You.” Parker who had been a session guitarist for Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye was accused of plagiarizing the melody from Huey Lewis and the News song “I Want a New Drug,” resulting in Lewis suing Parker, the pair settled out of court in 1985.

 

 

 

 

 
LedZeppelin1971Promo_fullpageOn August 12, 1968, Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones and John Bonham played together for the first time when they rehearsed in a small basement room on Gerrard Street just south of London’s Soho district. The first song they played was a version of “Train Kept A-Rollin’.” They also played “Smokestack Lightning” and a version of “I’m Confused” (soon to become “Dazed And Confused”). The first live dates they played were as the Yardbirds, and it was not until the following month when they started to use the name Led Zeppelin.

 

 

 

CheapthrillsOn August 12, 1968, Big Brother and the Holding Company (with Janis Joplin as primary lead vocalist) released the legendary album ‘Cheap Thrills.’ It reached #1 on the Billboard charts in its eighth week in October. It kept the #1 spot for eight (nonconsecutive) weeks while the single, “Piece of My Heart” also became a huge hit. By the end of the year it was the most successful album of 1968, having sold nearly a million copies. The cover was drawn by cartoonist R. Crumb (the band’s original cover idea, a picture of the group naked in bed together, was dropped by the record company). Crumb had originally intended his art for the LP back cover, with a portrait of Joplin on the front. But Joplin, an avid fan of underground comics, and especially the work of Crumb, so loved the Cheap Thrills illustration that she demanded Columbia Records place it on the front cover. It is #9 on Rolling Stone’s list of one hundred greatest album covers.

 

Woodstock_'94_posterOn August 12, 1994, Woodstock ’94 opened in Saugerties, New York on the 25th anniversary of the Woodstock Music and Art Fair. More than 30 acts performed at the three-day event, including Red Hot Chili Peppers, Sheryl Crow, Aerosmith, Metallica, and Nine Inch Nails, for a crowd estimated at between 235,000 and 350,000 people.

 

 

 

 

 

 
supremes_Baby_loveOn August 13, 1964, in Studio A at Hitsville U.S.A. in Detroit, the Supremes recorded “Baby Love.” Considered one of the most popular songs of the late 20th century, “Baby Love” was ranked #324 on the Rolling Stone list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. It was also the second of five Supremes songs in a row to go to number-one in the United States, reaching the top spot of the Billboard Hot 100 on October 31, 1964, and staying there for four weeks

 

 

 

250px-Jefferson_Airplane_early_1966On August 13, 1965, Jefferson Airplane made their live debut at San Francisco’s Matrix Club. In the audience that night was future Jefferson Airplane/Starship member Grace Slick.The photograph of the members of Jefferson Airplane that was featured on the front cover of their best-known album, ‘Surrealistic Pillow’ (1967), was taken inside the Matrix.

 

 

 

American_Woman45On August 13, 1969, at the RCA studios in Chicago, the Guess Who recorded “American Woman.” The song originated from their live jam at a curling rink concert in Kitchener, Ontario, with lead singer Burton Cummings improvising lyrics to fit the music. Shortly after its release, the Guess Who were invited to play at the White House. Because of its supposed anti-American lyrics, Pat Nixon asked that they not play “American Woman.” The song is noted for its memorable anti-American line. “I don’t want your war machines/I don’t need your ghetto scenes.” The song hit #1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

 

 

 

 
220px-The_McCoysOn August 14, 1965, the McCoys’ “Hang On Sloopy” was released. It will enter the Hot 100 three weeks later and top the chart by the first week of October. It was written by Wes Farrell and Bert Russell, originally titled “My Girl Sloopy.” It was named for singer Dorothy Sloop, who used the name “Sloopy” on stage. It was first recorded by the Vibrations in 1964, for Atlantic Records (45-2222), becoming a top-30 hit.

 

 

 

MaggiereasonOn August 14, 1971, Rod Stewart’s “Maggie May” was released in the US, where it will reach #1 and become his first Billboard chart hit. It was initially released as the B-side of the single “Reason to Believe,” but DJs in the USA (possibly in Cleveland, Ohio) became fonder of the B-side and the song was reclassified, with “Maggie May” becoming the A-side. Stewart would later remark: “I cannot see how the single is such a hit. It has no melody.” In 2004, Rolling Stone ranked the song #130 on their list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

 

 

 

Rock_n_MeOn August 14, 1976, Steve Miller released “Rock ‘N Me,” one of his three hit singles not credited to the Steve Miller Band. The song was released as the second single from the group’s ninth studio album ‘Fly Like an Eagle’ in 1976. The North American release of the single was credited to Steve Miller, while the European release was credited as Steve Miller Band. The song was the band’s second #1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100, where it stayed at the top for 1 week.

 

 

 

 

 

220px-Raccoon_climbing_in_tree_-_Cropped_and_color_correctedOn August 15, 1968, at EMI’s Abbey Road Studios in London, the Beatles recorded the Paul McCartney composition “Rocky Raccoon,” the last Beatles song to feature John Lennon playing harmonica. Producer George Martin played the honky-tonk piano. In Mojo magazine in October, 2008, McCartney acknowledged that the style of the song is a pastiche, saying, “I was basically spoofing the folksinger.” Lennon attributed the song to Paul, saying “Couldn’t you guess? Would I have gone to all that trouble about Gideon’s Bible and all that stuff?” Paul McCartney was inspired while playing acoustic guitar with John Lennon and Donovan in India (where the Beatles had gone on a retreat).

 

 

 

woodstockOn August 15, 1969, Woodstock Festival was held on Max Yasgur’s 600 acre farm in Bethel outside New York. The event was scheduled: August 15–17, 1969. Attended by over 400,000 people, it featured the music of, Jimi Hendrix, Joe Cocker, Crosby Stills Nash & Young, Santana, the Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Grateful Dead, Janis Joplin, the Band, Canned Heat, Joan Baez, Melanie, Ten Years After, Sly and the Family Stone, Johnny Winter, Jefferson Airplane, Ravi Shanker, Country Joe and the Fish, Blood Sweat and Tears, Arlo Guthrie, and Joe Cocker. During the three days there were three deaths, two births and four miscarriages. Joni Mitchell was booked to appear but had to pull out due to being booked for a TV show, wrote the song “Woodstock.”

 

 

 

 
elvisPresleyAlohafromHawaiiOn August 16, 1977, at his Graceland home in Memphis, Elvis Presley took the book he’d been reading, Frank Adams’ “The Scientific Search For The Face Of Jesus,” and went into his bathroom.

“Don’t fall asleep in there,” said girlfriend Ginger Alden, knowing he had a habit of nodding off.

“Okay, I won’t,” he said. Ginger went back to sleep.

At 1:30 p.m. CST, Ginger awoke and saw Elvis was still gone. When knocking on the bathroom door produced no reply, she entered and found his lifeless body on the floor in front of the toilet.

Alden called for Elvis associates Joe Esposito and Al Strada, who arrived and called the fire department. An ambulance was dispatched. Daughter Lisa Marie and father Vernon arrived in the bathroom, but Lisa Marie was quickly removed. Elvis was rushed to Baptist Memorial Hospital, where, after several attempts to revive him, he died at 3:30 p.m. CST.

His autopsy was performed at 7:00 p.m. The official coroner’s report listed “cardiac arrhythmia” as the cause of Presley’s death, but this was later admitted to be a ruse by the Presley family with the help of autopsy physicians to cover up the real cause of death: a cocktail of ten prescribed drugs, taken together in doses no doctor would ever prescribe.

The phrase “cardiac arrhythmia,” in the context of the coroner’s report, means little more than a stopped heart; the report initially tried to attribute the arrhythmia to cardiovascular disease, but Elvis’ own personal physician has stated that Presley had no such chronic problems at the time. Most of Elvis’ many health problems can and have been traced back to rampant abuse of prescription drugs.

The painkillers Morphine and Demerol. Chloropheniramine, an antihistamine. The tranquilizers Placidyl and Vailum. Finally, four drugs were found in “significant” quantities: Codeine, an opiate, Ethinamate, largely prescribed at the time as a “sleeping pill,” Quaaludes, and a barbituate, or depressant, that has never been identified. It has also been rumored that Diazepam, Amytal, Nembutal, Carbrital, Sinutab, Elavil, Avental, and Valmid were found in his system at death.

The phrase “cardiac arrhythmia,” in the context of the coroner’s report, means little more than a stopped heart; the report initially tried to attribute the arrhythmia to cardiovascular disease, but Elvis’ own personal physician has stated that Presley had no such chronic problems at the time.

He left an estate valued at 4.9 million dollars, which by 1993 had grown to between 50 and 100 million.

 

200px-Everly_Brothers_-_CroppedOn August 16, 1957, at RCA’s McGavock Street studios in Nashville, the Everly Brothers recorded “Wake Up Little Susie.” The song reached #1 on the Billboard Pop chart and the Cash Box Best Selling Records chart, despite having been banned from Boston radio stations for lyrics that, at the time, were considered “suggestive.” It was ranked at #311 on the Rolling Stone magazine’s list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

 

 

 

 

last_Train_to_Clarksville_coverOn August 16, 1966, the Monkees released their first single, “Last Train to Clarksville.” The song refers to Clarksville, Tennessee, which is in close proximity to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, the home of the 101st Airborne Division which flew numerous missions over Vietnam during the Vietnam War. The song topped the Billboard Hot 100 on November 5, 1966.

 

 

 

 

ramonesOn August 16, 1974, the Ramones made their live debut at CBGB in New York. Despite achieving only limited commercial success, the band was a major influence on the punk rock movement in both the US and, perhaps to a greater extent, in the UK.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the-beatles-353x-353xOn August 17, 1960, in Hamburg, Germany, the Beatles began the first of 48 nights performing at the Indra Club, on stage for 4½ hours on weekdays, 6 hours on weekends. The arrangement led to 20-minute versions of songs like “Long Tall Sally.” The club owner, Bruno Koschmider, told the Beatles to “mach shau,” or really put on a show, which led to the band screaming, shouting, and leaping about the stage and sometimes playing while lying on the floor. John Lennon often yelled at the German audiences, called them Nazis, shouted “Sieg Heil!” at them, and wore outlandish outfits. One time he appeared on stage in only his underwear, and another time he had a toilet seat around his neck. The young crowd loved it. The Beatles eventually broke their contract and moved to the Top Ten Club. Koschmider exacted his revenge by getting George Harrison deported for being too young to play in bars, and Paul and Pete Best deported for starting a fire in the tiny room the group shared behind a screen in a local movie house.

 

 

jimihendrix-x600-1405632252On August 17, 1969, on the final day of the three-day Woodstock festival in Bethel, New York, there were performances by Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, the Who, Jimi Hendrix, Ten Years After, John Sebastian, Sha Na Na, Joe Cocker, Country Joe and the Fish, the Band, Ten Years After, Johnny Winter and the Paul Butterfield Blues Band.

 

 

 

 

nnnnnnnnnnnOn August 17, 1991, Nirvana shot the video for “Smells Like Teen Spirit” at GMT Studios in Culver City, California, costing less than $50,000 to make, the shoot features real Nirvana fans as the audience. The video won Nirvana the Best New Artist and Best Alternative Group awards at the 1992 MTV Video Music Awards, and in 2000 the Guinness World Records named ‘Teen Spirit’ the Most Played Video on MTV Europe.

 

 

 

This Week In Music History – July 21 – July 27

220px-Black_Sabbath_-_Master_of_RealityOn July 21, 1971, ‘Master of Reality” by Black Sabbath was released. The LP is credited as the foundation of doom, stoner and sludge metal and was certified double platinum after having sold over 2 million copies. It peaked at #5 on the UK Albums Chart and at #8 in the US.

 

 

 

 
ACDC_Back_in_BlackOn July 21, 1980, AC/DC released their sixth internationally released studio album ‘Back In Black,’ the first AC/DC album recorded without former lead singer Bon Scott, who died on February 19, 1980 at the age of 33. It was very successful around the world, and despite never reaching number one on the US Billboard 200, it received the 22x Multi-Platinum distinction. As of June 2011, the album has sold an estimated 50 million copies worldwide.

 

 

 

220px-GunsnRosesAppetiteforDestructionalbumcoverOn July 21 1987, Guns N’ Roses released their debut album on Geffen Records called ‘Appetite for Destruction.’ It featured the singles “Welcome to the Jungle,” “Sweet Child o’ Mine,” and “Paradise City.” The album now has worldwide sales in excess of 28 million, 18 million of which are in the US, making it the best-selling debut album of all time there.

 

 

 

 

 

 
Bluesbreakers_John_Mayall_with_Eric_ClaptonOn July 22, 1966, John Mayall and Eric Clapton released the album ‘Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton.’ The album is also known as Beano because of its cover photograph showing Clapton reading The Beano, a British children’s comic. The guitar that Eric Clapton used during these sessions was a sunburst 1960 Gibson Les Paul Standard with two PAF Humbucking pickups. The album consists of blues standards by long-established artists such as Otis Rush, Freddie King and Robert Johnson, as well as a few originals penned by Mayall and Clapton. Most tracks serve as a showcase for the young Clapton’s playing.

 

 

 

MyAim_isTrueOn July 22, 1977, Stiff Records released ‘My Aim Is True’ the debut album from Elvis Costello in the UK (March 1978 in the US). The album cover was designed by Barney Bubbles, but he was uncredited on the sleeve. The cover art features rows of tiny black and white checks (surrounding the photo of Costello) on which the phrase “Elvis Is King” was written. Costello’s pose on the cover would become an iconic look for him, with the Buddy Holly glasses and the knees bent inwards together. He struck a similar pose in the photo on the back of the original sleeve. In 2004, it was #37 of the top 100 albums of the 1970′s by Pitchfork which reported the album to be “held by many as the most impressive debut in pop music history.”

 

 

 

 

Every_Good_Boy_Deserves_FavourOn July 23, 1971, the Moody Blues released their seventh album, ‘Every Good Boy Deserves Favour.’ The album reached #1 on the British album charts, in addition to a three week stay at #2 in the United States, and produced one top-40 single, “The Story in Your Eyes.” The track “Emily’s Song” was written by John Lodge for his newborn daughter.

 

 

 

 
coldiceOn July 23, 1977, Foreigner’s “Cold As Ice” was released. It became one of the best known songs of the band in the US, peaking at #6 in the Billboard Hot 100. It was initially the B-side of some versions of the “Feels Like the First Time” 45 rpm single. It is featured in the video game Rock Band 3.

 

 

 

 
AmyWinehouseBerlin2007On July 23, 2011, Amy Winehouse was found dead at her north London home, she was 27. A Metropolitan Police spokesman confirmed that a 27-year-old woman had died in Camden and that the cause of death was as yet unexplained. London Ambulance Service said it had been called to the flat at 1554 BST and sent two vehicles but the woman died. The troubled singer had a long battle with drink and drugs which overshadowed her recent musical career. In 2012, Winehouse was listed at number 26 on VH1′s 100 Greatest Women in Music. The BBC has called her “the pre-eminent vocal talent of her generation.”

 

 

 

 

 

zzzzzzzzzOn July 24, 1964, the Zombies released the single “She’s Not There.” It reached #12 in the UK Singles Chart in September 1964, and reached #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the US at the beginning of December 1964. In Canada, it reached #2. Rolling Stone magazine ranked “She’s Not There” #297 on its list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

 

 

 

 

YlittlegamesOn July 24, 1967, the Yardbirds released ‘Little Games,’ their final album before disbanding. Jimmy Page used his guitar-bowing technique on the cuts “Tinker Tailor Soldier Sailor” and “Glimpses.” The song “White Summer” would later be performed live at Led Zeppelin concerts as a medley with “Black Mountain Side.” The album peaked at #80 on Billboard’s Pop Albums chart.

 

 

 

LaBambaposter1987On July 24, 1987, the movie biography of Richie Valens called La Bamba opens in US theatres. The film starred Lou Diamond Phillips as Valens and Esai Morales as Ritchie’s older brother Bob. The production had the full support of the Valenzuela family and Bob and Connie Valenzuela even came to the set to help the actors portray their characters correctly. The music was performed by Los Lobos. In its opening weekend, the film grossed a total of $5,698,884 and eventually grossed $52,678,820 in the US in 12 weeks

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last_Train_to_Clarksville_coverOn July 25 1966, at RCA Victor Studio B in Hollywood, the Monkees recorded “Last Train To Clarksville.” The song refers to Clarksville, Tennessee, which is in close proximity to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, the home of the 101st Airborne Division which flew numerous missions over Vietnam during the Vietnam War. The song topped the Billboard Hot 100 on November 5, 1966.

 

 

 

 

Creedence_Clearwater_Revival_-_Cosmo's_FactoryOn July 25, 1970, Creedence Clearwater Revival released their fifth studio album, ‘Cosmo’s Factory.’ When the album was released it became a world-wide hit, topping the album charts in six countries. Almost twenty years later, on December 13, 1990, it received a certification of 4 times platinum with sales of over four million units sold. In January 1970, the double A-sided single, “Travelin’ Band”/”Who’ll Stop the Rain,” peaked at #2 on the Billboard Hot 100.

 

 

 

 

Metallica_-_Kill_'Em_All_coverOn July 25, 1983, Metallica released the album ‘Kill ‘Em All.’ The band initially intended to title the album ‘Metal Up Your Ass’ with the cover featuring a toilet bowl with a hand clutching a dagger emerging from it. However, their record label Megaforce urged them to change this, and they agreed, switching to ‘Kill ‘Em All.’ This time the cover featured the shadow of a hand letting go of a bloodied hammer. Since its release, it has been certified 3× platinum by the RIAA, having sold over three million copies in the US.

 

 

 

 

 
Cooke_in_studioOn July 26, 1960, Sam Cooke released the single “Chain Gang.” The song was inspired after a chance meeting with an actual chain-gang of prisoners on a highway, seen while Sam was on tour. According to legend, Cooke and his brother Charles felt sorry for the men and gave them several cartons of cigarettes. The song reached #2 in the US pop and R&B charts, and #9 in the UK.

 

 

 

 

 

ZZ_Top_-_Tres_HombresOn July 26, 1973, ZZ Top released their third album, ‘Tres Hombres.’ Contained the deep cuts “Jesus Just Left Chicago,” “Beer Drinkers & Hell Raisers,” and “Waitin’ for the Bus;” as well as the single “La Grange” which peaked at #41 on the Billboard Hot 100. The album peaked at #8 on the Billboard 200. The album marked the first of many times the band worked with engineer Terry Manning.

 

 

 

 

 
220px-Paul_McCartney_&_Wings-Band_on_the_Run_album_coverOn July 27, 1974, Wings started a seven-week run at #1 on the UK album chart with ‘Band On The Run,’ featuring the title-track, “Jet” and the US hit “Helen Wheels.” It became Wings’ most successful album and remains the most celebrated of Paul McCartney’s post-Beatles albums. It was 1974′s top-selling studio album in the United Kingdom and Australia and sold over 6 million copies world-wide.

 

 

 
Queen_1984_012On July 27, 1986, Queen became the first western act since Louis Armstrong in 1964 to perform in Easton Europe when they played at Budapest’s Nepstadion, Hungary, the gig was filmed and released as ‘Queen Magic in Budapest’.

 

 

 

 

This Week In Music History – July 7 – July 13

220px-ElvisPresley_ThatsAllRight_Sun_209_45On July 7, 1954, producer Sam Phillips took a recording of Elvis Presley singing “That’s All Right” to Memphis radio station WHBQ DJ Dewey Phillips. On hearing the news that Dewey was going to play his record, Presley went to the local movie theater to calm his nerves. Phillips played the song just after 9.30 that evening, the phone lines lit up asking the DJ to play the song again. “That’s All Right” was officially released on July 19, 1954. Rolling Stone magazine argued in a 2004 article that Presley’s recording of “That’s All Right” was the first rock-and-roll record.

 

 

 

AbbeyRoadOn July 7, 1969, George Harrison recorded his new song, “Here Comes the Sun,” with just two other Beatles, Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr, at Abbey Road Studios in London. John Lennon was absent, recovering from a car crash in Scotland. The following day he taped his lead vocals, and he and McCartney recorded their backing vocals twice to give a fuller sound. A harmonium and handclaps were added on July 16th. Harrison added an electric guitar run through a Leslie speaker on August 6th, and the orchestral parts (George Martin’s score for two piccolos, two flutes, two alto flutes and two clarinets) were added on August 15th. The track was finally completed four days later with the addition of Harrison’s Moog synthesizer part. The song was included on the now famous ‘Abbey Road’ LP.

 

 

220px-Styx_-_The_Grand_IllusionOn July 7, 1977, Styx released their seventh studio album, ‘The Grand Illusion.’ It launched the band to stardom, spawning the hit singles “Come Sail Away” and “Fooling Yourself” and selling over three million copies in the US. The album cover art, created by Alton Kelley and Stanley Mouse, is an homage to a painting by René Magritte entitled “Le Blanc-Seing”.

 

 

 

 

mannheim_7-2-80-7On July 7, 1980, Led Zeppelin played their last-ever concert when they appeared in West Berlin at the end of a European tour. The concert was the last scheduled stop on a 14-date European tour in support of the group’s most recent (and ultimately final) studio album, 1979′s ‘In Through the Out Door.‘ The set included “Black Dog,” “Rock and Roll,” “Kashmir,” “Trampled Underfoot” and “Stairway to Heaven.”  They finished the show with a 17-minute version of “Whole Lotta Love.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nowhere_Man-The_BeatlesOn July 8, 1966, the Beatles released the ‘Nowhere Man’ 4-track EP in the UK, which included: “Drive My Car,” “Michelle” and “You Won’t See Me.” The EP was only released in mono, with the catalogue number Parlophone GEP 8952. All four tracks were taken from the Beatles sixth UK studio album, ‘Rubber Soul.’

 

 

 

 

jimi-Evening-Standard-HultoOn July 8, 1967, in Jacksonville, Florida, Jimi Hendrix opened for the Monkees on their latest tour. The band loved him, but the audience kept screaming for Davy Jones. Hendrix was dropped after six shows and told his act was not suitable for the Monkees’ teenybopper audience.

 

 

 

 

Go-Go'sBeautyandtheBeatalbumcoverOn July 8, 1981, the Go-Go’s released their debut album, ‘Beauty and the Beat.’ The LP sold in excess of two million copies and reached double platinum status, making it one of the most successful debut albums of all time. In 2003, the album was ranked #414 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. It is now widely considered as one of the cornerstone albums of 1980′s new wave music.

 

 

 

 

 

 

220px-Dick_Clark_American_Bandstand_1961On July 9, 1956, Dick Clark made his debut as host of Bandstand on Philadelphia TV station WFIL. He took over from Bob Horn, who had been charged with driving while intoxicated during a highly-publicized police crackdown. The show’s name would be changed to American Bandstand when it went to ABC-TV in 1957. Clark relinquished his hosting duties in 1989 to 26 year-old David Hirsch, but the program died within a matter of months. Still, it had been on the air for 37 years – a record for a television variety show.

 

 

 

blowingUnauthorizedOn July 9, 1962, Bob Dylan recorded “Blowin’ In the Wind” at Columbia Recording Studios in New York City during an afternoon session. Although it has been described as a protest song, it poses a series of rhetorical questions about peace, war and freedom. In 1999, the song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. In 2004, it was ranked #14 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the “500 Greatest Songs of All Time.”

 

 

 

200px-Jerry_Garcia_1968On July 9, 1995, the Grateful Dead give their last concert with leader Jerry Garcia at Chicago’s Soldier Field. Jerry would die of a heart attack a month later while in drug rehab.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harry_Nilsson_Son_of_SchmilssonOn July 10, 1972, Harry Nilsson’s album, ‘Son of Schmilsson’ was released in the US. Most of the recording sessions for this album were extensively filmed at the request of Nilsson. They were to be edited for a planned documentary called, Did Somebody Drop His Mouse? which was never released commercially. It featured George Harrison under the name George Harrysong and Ringo Starr, listed as Richie Snare, on some of the tracks.

 

 

 

 

KinksLowBudgetOn July 10, 1979, the Kinks released the album ‘Low Budget’ in North America. The Kinks recorded the LP in the US and launched an extensive concert tour in America to support the album. Six of the eleven songs from the album are included on the double-live album ‘One for the Road’ which was recorded in 1979 and 1980 during the Low Budget tour.

 

 

 

 

 

 

RollStones-Single1969_HonkyTonkWomenOn July 11, 1969, the Rolling Stones released the single “Honky Tonk Women” in North America. The song was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards while on holiday in Brazil from late December 1968 to early January 1969. Inspired by Brazilian gauchos at the ranch where Jagger and Richards were staying in Matão, São Paulo, the song was originally released as an acoustic country song. The song topped the US Billboard Hot 100 for four weeks in August/September of 1969. Ranked #116 on the list of Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time in 2004.

 

 

 

Fleetwood_Mac_-_Fleetwood_MacOn July 11, 1975, Fleetwood Mac released their second self-titled album. The first one was issued in 1968. The album reached #1 on the Billboard 200 over a year after entering the chart. It launched three top twenty singles: “Over My Head,” “Rhiannon” and “Say You Love Me,” the last two falling just short of the top ten, both at #11. In 1976, it was certified 5x platinum by the RIAA representing shipments of five million units. In 2003, the album was ranked #182 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

 

 

 

 
voodooLounge94On July 11, 1994, the Rolling Stones released the album ‘Voodoo Lounge,’ the first album without their long-time bass guitarist Bill Wyman, who left the group in early 1993. As their first new release under their new alliance with Virgin Records, it ended a five-year gap since their last studio album, ‘Steel Wheels’ in 1989.

 

 

 

 

 

 

RollingStones02PA241011On July 12, 1962, the Rolling Stones played their first concert at the Marquee club in London. Their line-up consisted of lead vocalist Mick Jagger, guitarists Keith Richards and Brian Jones, Dick Taylor on bass, pianist Ian Stewart and Mick Avory, later of the Kinks, on drums. Avory and Taylor would be replaced by Tony Chapman on drums and Bill Wyman on bass. Chapman didn’t work out and drummer Charlie Watts completed the Stones’ line-up in January 1963.

 

 

 

 
Beach_boys_california_girlsOn July 12, 1965, the Beach Boys released the single “California Girls.” It is one of The Beach Boys’ most famous songs and has been included on countless greatest hits compilations. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame included the song in its of the “500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll.” In 2004, Rolling Stone magazine ranked it 71st on its list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. “California Girls” reached #3 on the Billboard Hot 100.

 

 

 

 

disco600On July 12, 1979, Chicago disc jockey Steve Dahl held the infamous Disco Demolition in between games of a baseball doubleheader at Comiskey Park in Chicago. Dahl burned Disco records brought by fans who received discount admission. Some of those fans decided to start their own fires and a mini-riot ensued, forcing the White Sox to forfeit the second game.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
230px-LiveAidlogoOn July 13, 1985, the first Live Aid concerts were held at JFK Stadium in Philadelphia and at Wembley Stadium in London. Producer Bob Geldof headed the effort by attracting big name artists such as Paul McCartney, The Who, David Bowie, Mick Jagger, Queen, Tina Turner, The Cars, Bryan Adams, Hall and Oates, Lionel Richie and Phil Collins. The performances were shown live via satellite for 18 consecutive hours and helped raise millions of dollars for starving people in Ethiopia.

 

 

 

 

220px-Michael_jackson_bad_cd_cover_1987_cddaOn July 13, 1987, representatives of fifty of America’s largest record retailers are guests at Michael Jackson’s home in Encino, California to preview his new album, ‘Bad.’ The LP, which includes the singles, “I Just Can’t Stop Loving You,” “Bad,” “The Way You Make Me Feel,” “Man in the Mirror” and “Dirty Diana,” would go on to reach #1 on the Billboard Hot 200 chart and sell over 30 million copies worldwide.

 

This Week In Music History – May 19 – 25

220px-Bobby_Darin_1959On May 19, 1958, Bobby Darin released the single, “Splish Splash.” The song was co-written by New York City DJ Murray the K’s mother, Jean Kaufman (credited as Jean Murray), who suggested the song’s opening line and title. The song went to #3 on the US charts. It was released as the first eight-track master recording pressed to a plastic 45-RPM disc.

 

 

 

Dire_Straits_-_Sultans_Of_Swing_picture_coverOn May 19, 1978, Dire Straits released their first major label single “Sultans Of Swing,” recorded on a £120 budget. The song was first recorded as a demo at Pathway Studios, North London, in July 1977, and quickly acquired a following after it was put on rotation at Radio London. The song was then re-recorded in early 1978 at Basing Street Studios for the band’s debut album ‘Dire Straits.’ The song reached the top 10 in both the UK and the USA, reaching #8 on the UK Singles Chart and #4 on the Billboard Hot 100 and helped drive sales of the album, which also became a hit.

 

 

220px-Peter_Gabriel_So_CD_coverOn May 19, 1986, Peter Gabriel released the album ‘So.’ The LP is the best-selling album of Gabriel’s career and charted at #1 in the UK Album Chart, and #2 on the Billboard 200 in the US It is certified triple platinum in the UK, and five times platinum in the US. The second track on the record is Gabriel’s most popular single, “Sledgehammer.”

 

 

 

 
220px-BillHaleyOn May 20, 1954, Bill Haley And His Comets’ “Rock Around the Clock” was released. The record would find only limited success until the following year when it was included on the soundtrack of the film Blackboard Jungle. Haley’s recording is widely considered to be the song that, more than any other, brought rock and roll into mainstream culture around the world. It was a #1 single on both the US and UK charts and also re-entered the UK Singles Chart in the 1960s and 1970s. The song is ranked #158 on the Rolling Stone magazine’s list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

 

 

FooFighters-TheColourAndTheShapeOn May 20, 1997, Foo Fighters released their second album ‘The Colour And The Shape,’ the album was a Grammy nominee for Best Rock Album in 1998. Even though Foo Fighters are an American band, the word ‘Colour’ in the album title is always spelled with the British spelling. This was a nod to producer Gil Norton, who is British.

 

 

 

 

001On May 21, 1955, Chuck Berry recorded “Maybellene,” which would become his first hit record, reaching #5 on the US Pop chart and #1 on the R&B chart. In the heyday of Pat Boone, Frank Sinatra, Perry Como and the McGuire Sisters, it was one of the few rock ‘n’ roll songs to get any radio air play that year. Rolling Stone magazine wrote, “Rock & roll guitar starts here.” The song was a major hit among both black and white audiences and it was quickly covered by several other artists after its initial release.

 

 

275px-Crosby_Stills_Nash_and_Young_1970On May 21, 1970, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young recorded “Ohio.” Neil Young wrote the lyrics to “Ohio” after seeing the photos of the incident in Life Magazine. On the evening that CSN&Y entered Record Plant Studios in Los Angeles, the song had already been rehearsed, and the quartet with their regular rhythm section recorded it live in just a few takes. During the same session they recorded the single’s equally direct B-side, Stephen Stills‘s ode to the war’s dead, “Find the Cost of Freedom.” The record was mastered with the participation of the four principals, rush-released by Atlantic and heard on the radio with only a few weeks delay. Young termed the Kent State incident as “probably the biggest lesson ever learned at an American place of learning” and reported that “David Crosby cried when we finished this take.” Indeed, Crosby can be heard keening “Four, why? Why did they die?” and “How many more?” in the fade.

 
220px-Headquarters_-_The_MonkeesOn May 22, 1967, the Monkees released their third album, ‘Headquarters,’ the one album on which they played their own instruments, mostly on songs they had written. The LP reached thetop of the Billboard 200 chart and was certified double platinum in the US with sales of more than two million copies within the first two months of release. As of 2008 it has sold seven million copies in the US and achieved global sales of 11.6 million.

 

 

 
220px-Ozzy_Osbourne_-_Black_RainOn May 22, 2007, Ozzy Osbourne‘s ‘Black Rain’ was released. “It’s a well-put-together album,” says Ozzy. “I took my time on (it) and (guitarist) Zakk (Wylde) plays some amazing stuff as always.” “I Don’t Wanna Stop” is the lead single. “People keep saying to me, ‘You’ll be quitting soon, retiring.’ I don’t wanna stop!” adds Ozzy. “I’d miss the fans. I’d miss the buzz, seeing the crowd going crazy.” The album was recorded at Osbourne’s home studio in L.A.

 

 

 

 

 
TommyalbumcoverOn May 23, 1969, the Who released their fourth album, ‘Tommy.’ A double album telling a the story of a “deaf, dumb and blind kid” who became the leader of a messianic movement, Tommy was the first musical work to be billed as a rock opera. In 1998, it was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame for “historical, artistic and significant value.” In 2003, Rolling Stone magazine ranked it #96 on its list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. It has sold over 20 million copies worldwide.

 

 

 

elton_John_-_Captain_Fantastic_and_the_Brown_Dirt_CowboyOn May 23, 1975, Elton John‘s ‘Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy’ album was released, the first to be certified a million-seller on its first day of release and first album to debut at #1, where it stayed for seven weeks. On the UK Albums Chart, it peaked at #2. In 2003, the album was ranked #158 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

 

 

 
Jackflash1On May 24, 1968, the Rolling Stones released their single “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” in the UK (June 1st in the US). The Rolling Stones have played the song during every tour since its release and it ranks as the song the band has played in concert most frequently. It reached the top of the UK charts and peaked at #3 in the US.

 

 

 

Van_Halen_-_OU812On May 24, 1988, Van Halen released the LP ‘OU812.’ their second LP to feature vocalist Sammy Hagar The album’s front cover is an homage to the classic cover of ‘With The Beatles.’ Album artwork for the back cover is Hugo Rheinhold’s Affe mit Schädel.

 

 

 

 

 

DioHolyDiverOn May 25, 1983, Dio released the album ‘Holy Diver.’ The cover was controversial, featuring a devil killing a cleric. Dio was quick to argue that appearances are misleading, that it could just as easily be a priest killing a devil, wanting people not to “judge a book by its cover.” The demon-like monster is the band’s mascot known as “Murray” and is featured on several other Dio albums as well. When the “DIO” logo is viewed upside-down it can be interpreted as spelling either the word “DIE” or “DEVIL.” However, Ronnie James Dio denied that and called it purely coincidental. The original vinyl release also had a photo-montage LP-liner, with images from both Rainbow and Black Sabbath days.